...Grace Notes... San Diego
Laugh, even when you feel too sick or too worn out or tired.
Smile, even when you’re trying not to cry and the tears are blurring your vision. Sing, even when people stare at you and tell you your voice is crappy. Trust, even when your heart begs you not to. Twirl, even when your mind makes no sense of what you see. Frolick, even when you are made fun of. Kiss, even when others are watching. Sleep, even when you’re afraid of what the dreams might bring. Run, even when it feels like you can’t run any more. And, always, remember, even when the memories pinch your heart. Because the pain of all your experience is what makes you the person you are now. And without your experience—-you are an empty page, a blank notebook, a missing lyric. What makes you brave is your willingness to live through your terrible life and hold your head up high the next day. So don’t live life in fear. Because you are stronger now, after all the crap has happened, than you ever were back before it started.
Alysha Speer (via observando)
Of all forms of caution, caution in love is perhaps the most fatal to true happiness.
Bertrand Russell, The Conquest of Happiness (via observando)

How many times have you tried to talk to someone about something that matters to you, tried to get them to see it the way you do? And how many of those times have ended with you feeling bitter, resenting them for making you feel like your pain doesn’t have any substance after all?

Like when you’ve split up with someone, and you try to communicate the way you feel, because you need to say the words, need to feel that somebody understands just how pissed off and frightened you feel. The problem is, they never do. “Plenty more fish in the sea,” they’ll say, or “You’re better off without them,” or “Do you want some of these potato chips?” They never really understand, because they haven’t been there, every day, every hour. They don’t know the way things have been, the way that it’s made you, the way it has structured your world. They’ll never realise that someone who makes you feel bad may be the person you need most in the world. They don’t understand the history, the background, don’t know the pillars of memory that hold you up. Ultimately, they don’t know you well enough, and they never can. Everyone’s alone in their world, because everybody’s life is different. You can send people letters, and show them photos, but they can never come to visit where you live.

Unless you love them. And then they can burn it down.

Michael Marshall Smith, Only Forward (via observando)

And at some point you realize that there are more flavors of pain than coffee. There’s the little empty pain of leaving something behind ‒ graduating, taking the next step forward, walking out of something familiar and safe into the unknown. There’s the big, whirling pain of life upending all of your plans and expectations. There’s the sharp little pains of failure, and the more obscure aches of successes that didn’t give you what you thought they would. There are the vicious, stabbing pains of hopes being torn up. The sweet little pains of finding others, giving them your love, and taking joy in their life as they grow and learn. There’s the steady pain of empathy that you shrug off so you can stand beside a wounded friend and help them bear their burdens.

And if you are very, very lucky, there are a few blazing hot little pains you feel when you realize that you are standing in a moment of utter perfection, an instant of triumph, or happiness, or mirth which at the same time cannot possibly last ‒ and yet will remain with you for life.

Everyone is down on pain, because they forget something important about it: Pain is for the living. Only the dead don’t feel it.

Jim Butcher, White Night (via observando)
With the right music, you either forget everything or you remember everything.
(via m-perle-noir)

(Source: alexbost, via heartdisires)

(Source: adultrunaway, via adultrunaway)

Anonymous said: Could you list 5 of your all-time favorite books? Books that have changed you, that you can re-read 10 times and still love them.

observando:

The Catcher in the Rye, J.D. Salinger: It shows you what a teenager thinks. His fears, what does he loves and how can they react.

On the Road, Jack Kerouac: The author can make you feel that you are traveling on the routes of United States in late 40s. He can make you feel free.

High Fidelity, Nick Hornby: I love music and this is a perfect book for music lovers. In the end, is a book about love, but in the middle of it is full of songs.

Ham on Rye, Charles Bukowski: Hank is one of my favorites writers (his poetry is amazing) and this is an autobiography. Every anecdote makes us understand why Bukowski thinks as he does.

A Moveable Feast, Ernest Hemingway: This book narrates Hemingway’s life in París in the 20s as an expatriate writer. You can read it 30 times.

(Source: memespice, via andrewquo)

Imagine life is a game in which you are juggling five balls. The balls are called work, family, health, friends, and integrity. And you’re keeping all of them in the air. But one day you finally come to understand that work is a rubber ball. If you drop it, it will bounce back. The other four balls…are made of glass. If you drop one of these, it will be irrevocably scuffed, nicked, perhaps even shattered.
James Patterson, Suzanne’s Diary for Nicholas (via observando)
Don’t think about what can happen in a month. Don’t think about what can happen in a year. Just focus on the 24 hours in front of you and do what you can to get closer to where you want to be.
Eric Thomas  (via thatkindofwoman)

(Source: natural-lifters, via goodideaexchange)

Raindrops and roses
these are just
some of my
favorite things